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British researchers have developed an app to trace the unfold of coronavirus and work out who’s most in danger as a method to mitigate the illness’s unfold.

Referred to as the Covid Symptom Tracker, the free app asks customers to fill in knowledge together with age, intercourse and postal code in addition to questions on a variety of current medical situations, resembling coronary heart illness and bronchial asthma.

App customers are then reportedly requested to spend one minute per day to report on how they really feel and reply questions on numerous totally different signs, together with coughs, fever and fatigue.

“The idea is it’s an early warning radar system as a result of we’re asking about non-classical signs as effectively, as a result of many individuals are reporting non-persistent cough, or feeling unwell or an odd feeling of a scarcity of style, or chest tightness that aren’t within the classical checklist but when we see it throughout the nation in clusters we all know they’re in all probability actual [symptoms of Covid-19],” Tim Spector, a professor of genetic epidemiology at King’s Faculty London, who’s main the work, advised The Guardian.

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The app is a collaborative effort between researchers at King’s Faculty London and Man’s and St Thomas’ hospitals, together with the well being knowledge firm ZOE.

They hope the know-how will present real-time info that aids in slowing down the unfold of the virus in the UK.

“The instant factor is we are going to get identified clusters of illness at totally different ranges of severity all around the nation and we are going to know what’s going on,” he defined to the British publication.

As of Tuesday afternoon, there are simply over 8,000 circumstances of COVID-19 within the U.Okay. and 423 deaths, based on the Johns Hopkins College and Drugs real-time map.

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